Nov 162017

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By G. Steven Bray

Back in Aug, I reported that on Congress’ to-do list was reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program, or NFIP. The program will expire on 12/8 unless Congress does something.

Tues, the House passed what it calls the 21st Century Flood Reform Act. The biggest reforms in the bill are provisions to encourage the private flood insurance market, transferring some of the risk away from the government.

Supporters of the reforms say that it will allow for lower cost policies that could appeal even to folks who aren’t required to have flood insurance. 80% of the flooded homes in Houston didn’t have flood insurance mainly because it wasn’t required. They weren’t located in a recognized flood zone. A lower-cost flood policy that could be bundled with homeowner’s and auto policies could be an attractive option.

Opponents of the bill say it will allow the private market to cherry pick the least risky properties from NFIP, making it financially unsound.

The bill also contains a $1 billion mitigation fund. A Pew Charitable Trust study showed that just 1% of homes covered under NFIP have produced almost a third of the claims due to repeat flooding. The funds will help folks modify their homes to reduce flood risk or to help them relocate.

The bill now goes to the Senate where its fate is uncertain. What is certain is that Congress must act in the next month to avoid disrupting the real estate markets in flood-prone communities.

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